The NASA-approved secret to sleeping and feeling better

The NASA-approved secret to sleeping and feeling better

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Want to know how get a better night’s rest, reduce anxiety and avoid those colds going around this time of year?

The answer may be easier than you think…

You see, according to joint research from NASA and the American College, you can get all of those benefits simply by putting a plant on your bedside table.

Sound too good to be true? Don’t stop reading yet…

Experts have long preached the benefits of house plants, and scientists are now catching up and realizing the advantages of bringing the outdoors in. That’s because the presence of plants in your home reduces your stress and anxiety and helps with the removal of airborne pollutants to help you beat colds, tight chests and insomnia.

The researchers at NASA even categorized which plants give you the most bang for your buck in your bedroom.

Here the top five in order of the benefits they offer:

1. Areca palm

The plant that can remove the most pollutants from the air in your home is the Madagascan areca palm.

And, it offers one more big benefit. According to the researchers, the areca palm actually releases moisture into the air, acting as a natural humidifier to soothe your nasal passages and help you breathe easier. So, if you’re prone to sinus trouble or colds, this is the plant for you.

2. Aloe vera

Another plant that will improve the air quality in your bedroom is the aloe vera plant. Not only does this plant release oxygen continuously, it also removes benzene (which is found in detergents and plastics) and formaldehyde (found in varnishes and floor finishes) from the air, ensuring the air you breathe throughout the night is fresh and pure.

3. English ivy

If you suffer from allergies to mold, adding a beautiful potted English ivy to your nightstand could help you feel better. That’s because researchers at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology found that English ivy in particular removes 78 percent of airborne mold in just 12 hours.

4. Dwarf date palm

The dwarf date palm is another great choice for your bedroom, as it cleans dangerous pollutants from the air, especially xylene, a volatile toxin found in solvents, paint thinner and cigarette smoke.

5. Boston fern

The Boston fern is the plant you want if you’re concerned about formaldehyde exposure. Although most people only think about this chemical when it comes to embalming, it’s actually far more common than you think.

Formaldehyde is used in making building materials. Many household products, including pressed-wood products, such as particleboard, plywood and fiberboard for your bedroom furniture, glues and adhesives, permanent-press fabrics, paper-product coatings and certain insulation materials. It’s even found in high concentrations in the exhaust from your car.

With the many ways you’re exposed to this dangerous pollutant each day, the Boston fern could be the best choice for protecting your health.

Surprisingly, these airborne pollutants can have a detrimental effect on your liver, the one organ in your body that works hard to spare you the ill-effects of this daily pollution and chemical onslaught. It turns out that air pollution can contribute to liver fibrosis, an illness associated with metabolic disease which can lead to cirrhosis — and worse.

So, while you take advantage of plants that can help improve the air in your home, don’t forget to support your liver so it can keep supporting you. Milk thistle — another protective plant — is a real liver lover. I get mine in Peak Liver Support, which contains several other beneficial compounds derived from pollution-fighting plants, including turmeric.


Sources:

dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5009063/The-plants-NASA-says-NEED-bedroom.html

cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/formaldehyde.html

Ze Zheng, Xuebao Zhang, Jiemei Wang, Aditya Dandeka, Hyunbae Kim, Yining Qiu, Xiaohua Xu, Yuqi Cui, Aixia Wang, Lung Chi Chen, Sanjay Rajagopalan, Qinghua Sun, Kezhong Zhang. Exposure to Fine Airborne Particulate Matters Induces Hepatic Fibrosis in Murine Models. Journal of Hepatology, 2015; DOI: 10.1016/j.jhep.2015.07.020

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